NE Box Newsletter for June 7, 2019 Pickup

Welcome to June! Welcome to a week of brimming boxes, packed full of fantastic local food, just for you!

 

This week we are super excited to bring you milk from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy. The milk is in heavy, glass bottles that keep the milk colder and preserve the fresh taste. And, they are reusable and returnable! The cost of the milk includes a bottle deposit of $2.00.

If you pick up your Nebraska Box from your workplace, Turbine Flats, or our warehouse, you can return it to us and we’ll credit your account. Or you can return it to one of these grocery stores for a $2.00 refund. Please give the bottle a rinse before bringing it back.  If you return it to us, bring it with you when you pick up your next Nebraska Box. Label the bottle clearly, with your name, pickup location, and box size. If you happen to have it, a piece of painters tape and a sharpie would work well for this.

Unfortunately, if you pick up at Paradigm Gardens, Ted and Wally’s, Relish, Super Saver, or Hy-Vee–you will not be able to return the bottle to us for a refund. (However you will notice that many Hy-Vees will take it back directly for a refund.)

See this list of locations in Lincoln and Omaha which will accept your bottle for a refund. Contact us for any questions you may have on this and we’ll be happy to answer them for you!

BEST BREAKFAST

Breakfast Sausage from Clear Creek Organic Farms (16 oz)

Cold Brew Coffee from Cultiva (3-pk)

Salted Grassfed Butter from Clear Creek Organic Farms (8 oz)

Whole Milk from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy (Half-gallon glass jug)

VEGGIE

Rhubarb from Clear Creek Organic Farms and Rolling Acres Farm

Salad Mix from Abie Vegetable People

Cucumber from Pekarek’s Produce*

Kale from Wolff Farms Produce

Bok Choi from Abie Vegetable People

Asparagus from Grandview Farm

Radishes from Wolff Farms Produce

SUPREME

Salted Grassfed Butter from Clear Creek Organic Farms (8 oz)

Whole Milk from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy (Half-gallon glass jug)

Salad Mix from Abie Vegetable People

Carrots from Pekarek’s Produce*

Radishes from Wolff Farms Produce

Arugula from The Edible Source (5 oz)

Asparagus from Grandview Farm*

Kale from Wolff Farms Produce

Grassfed Ground Beef from Range West Beef

BIG SUPREME

Salted Grassfed Butter from Clear Creek Organic Farms (8 oz)

Whole Milk from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy (Half-gallon Glass Jug)

Pea Shoots Microgreens from Robinette Farms (2 oz)

Salad Mix from Abie Vegetable People

Shredded Mild Yellow Cheddar Cheese from Jisa’s Farmstead Cheese

Asparagus from Grandview Farm*

Carrots from Pekarek’s Produce*

Radishes from Wolff Farms Produce

Grassfed Ground Beef from Range West Beef

Kale from Wolff Farms Produce

 

GARLIC GINGER BOK CHOY   

Bok choy can be prepared many ways but my favorite is a quick stir-fry with garlic and ginger. In less than 10 minutes you’ll have a tasty side dish that’s full of nutrients and anti-inflammatory health benefits.

Boy choy has always been one of my favorite side dish recipes. Why do I love it? It’s easy to prepare and the garlic ginger combination is so darn flavorful. I also love that a quick stir-fry makes the leaves tender but crisp. It’s that same crispiness you would expect from a vegetable from the cabbage family.

 

Also known as “Chinese Cabbage” there are several varieties of bok choy, or choi. Bok choy truly is a powerhouse of vitamins, minerals and nutrients. It’s loaded with vitamin A, C and K and contains antioxidants which protect the eyes and a significant amount of calcium and magnesium for strong bones. As a cruciferous vegetable it provides the same health benefits of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts for cardiovascular health and fighting cancer.

And that’s not even considering the bonus anti-inflammatory benefits of both garlic and ginger! So next time you want a healthy green side dish, switch up your normal spinach, green beans and zucchini routine with this boy choy recipe.

 

HOW TO PREPARE AND CUT BOK CHOY

Similar to leeks, bok choy can sometimes harbor dirt and debris under it’s leaves. To prepare the baby bok choy cut it in half, then rinse it under the faucet. If you’re using regular size bok choy, you can cut a small portion off the base then remove the individual leaves to rinse.

Baby bok choy can be cooked as halves, but I’d recommend slicing regular bok choy into smaller pieces before cooking.

HOW TO COOK BOK CHOY

Because it only takes a couple of minutes to cook, make sure to have your fresh ginger and garlic already minced. Then just follow these steps:

  • Heat two tablespoons of oil in a wok or sauté pan
  • Add the minced garlic and ginger and stir for 30 seconds
  • Add the bok choy and use tongs to toss and stir-fry for 2 minutes
  • Pour two tablespoons of water (or broth) into the pan, cover with a lid and cook for 2 minutes more
  • Turn off the heat, sprinkle a little sea salt and black pepper, stir and serve!

 

 

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Last year we shared this tip from the Cook’s Illustrated folks on how to store rhubarb….here’s a refresher for you from them…

The Best Way to Store Rhubarb

It turns out that the best method we’ve found for storing celery also works for rhubarb.

These days, rhubarb is available in many supermarkets from spring through summer. To determine the best way to store it, we trimmed and washed a few bunches and experimented with different methods. Leaving the rhubarb completely unprotected in the refrigerator caused the exposed ends to dry out, and the stalks turned limp within just a few days due to water loss. Sealing the stalks tightly in a zipper-lock bag or in plastic wrap caused them to soften in a few days as well. This is because airtight storage traps the ripening hormone ethylene, which activates enzymes that break down and soften the cell walls in many fruits and vegetables.

Though rhubarb and celery are unrelated, it turns out that the best method we’ve found for celery also works best for rhubarb: simply wrapping the stalks loosely in foil. The key is to wrap the stalks snugly enough to prevent the rhubarb from drying out—but not airtight (no need to tightly crimp) so ethylene can escape. Stored this way, our rhubarb maintained its juicy, ruby perfection for longer than two weeks.

THAT’S A WRAP: Wrap the rhubarb tightly enough to make a tidy bundle, but don’t tightly crimp the edges or the ethylene gas can’t escape.

And that’s a wrap from us this week too! Have an excellent week everyone.