NE Box Newsletter for July 26, 2019 Pickup

Hi All! How’s everyone liking this super warm weather? Well I’m not always the biggest fan of the hot weather, however I AM a super big fan of all the veg-a-growin’ like crazy under those nurturing rays… Tomatoes and bell peppers and onions–all the good stuff we’ve been waiting for.

Did you all catch Erin last week on 10/11 NOW? She was in a featured news story about all the sweet benefits of The Nebraska Box, both to local farmers and consumers. There’s also an interview with Adam Beckman, who is one of the farmers we work with to bring the farm to your table. Those cherry tomato beauties last week were grown by him and in this story you get a little peek into the whole weekly process. See if you can spot your tomatoes! Adam also grew this week’s delectable arugula. In case you missed them on the news, never fear! You can CLICK RIGHT HERE TO WATCH.

Telling all your friends and relatives and acquaintances about The Nebraska Box, then getting them to give you the credit gets YOU the reward! The offer still stands, if you successfully refer someone to The Nebraska Box, we’ll give you ten bucks! Either in the form of credit for buying more great local goods for yourself, or $10 to White Elm Brewing. Probably a good idea for you to shout it from the rooftops. Or, maybe just forward the news story to everyone you know. Make sure to tell them to give us YOUR NAME in the order comments at checkout!

Here’s what to look forward to on Friday:

Whole Bean Coffee from Cultiva (12 oz bag)

Raspberry Yogurt from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy (4-pack)

Grassfed Butter from Clear Creek Organic Farms (8 oz)

Chicken Eggs from Country Lane Gardens (1 dozen)

Green beans from Abie Vegetable People (1 lb)

Arugula from The Edible Source (5 oz)

Red or Gold Beet from RhizoCity Farms

Green Curly Kale from Abie Vegetable People

Turnips from Clear Creek Organic Farms

Red Cabbage from Pekarek’s Produce*

Tomatoes from Abie Vegetable People*

Green beans from Abie Vegetable People (1 lb)

Raspberry Yogurt from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy (4-pack)

Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread from Le Quartier Bakery

Arugula from The Edible Source (5 oz)

Turnips from Clear Creek Organic Farms

Red Cabbage from Pekarek’s Produce*

Cherry Tomatoes from The Edible Source

Soy-free Sweet Italian Pork Sausage from Clear Creek Organic Farms (1 lb)

Grassfed Butter from Clear Creek Organic Farms (8 oz)

Green beans from Abie Vegetable People (1 lb)

Raspberry Yogurt from Burbach’s Countryside Dairy (4-pack)

Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread from Le Quartier Bakery

Arugula from The Edible Source (5 oz)

Turnips from Clear Creek Organic Farms

Red Cabbage from Pekarek’s Produce*

Tomatoes from Abie Vegetable People*

Soy-free Sweet Italian Pork Sausage from Clear Creek Organic Farms (1 lb)

Lamb Kabobs from Bluff Valley Farm (~1 lb)

Any questions about our growing practices email Erin.  We’re proud the majority of our farmers grow completely chemical-free!  Unless asterisked, the farms on our list use organic-approved methods in their production pactices. 

We’ve got Whole Wheat Sourdough bread from Le Quartier this week. It has a moderate sour flavor with a wheaty counterpart and they say it pairs well with roasted or grilled meats and creamy soups. I’m betting that big thick slices of it, grilled, and rubbed with garlic, then topped with perfect slices of Rocky Top tomatoes and basil is going to rock your world. Of course there’s also Clear Creek Organic Farms butter to consider here, as we have that back for you this week. It would be good good good on this bread. And in your coffee. And to use with your chicken or duck eggs. Enveloping your steamed turnips, or for sauteing your cabbage and onions.

New this week is red cabbage from Pekarek’s Produce. It’s a prized member of the cruciferous family, and if you’d like, you can also get a head of green cabbage and try out your hand at lacto-fermenting with this recipe for Red and Green Kraut. It’s a dandy recipe that makes use of both colors of cabbage and is beautiful and delicious. Pretty darn high up on the healthy side of things, too.

The Clear Creek farmers raise mainly heritage breeds of pigs: Berkshire, Large Black, & Spotted Poland China. They’re never fed soy and they’re run on grass in the summer months during their grazing period. This week we’ve got their Sweet Italian pork sausage. Cooked up with some green bell peppers and onions and served with some pasta or rice. A grilled pizza would taste mighty fine with this sausage–First saute the sausage in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Break up large pieces until cooked throughout. It’s good to go on the pizza, on the grill, in your mouth…

Arugula is back this week and I’m all pepped up over it. A really simple preparation–beyond just shoving handfuls of those tender leaves right in your mouth–is to get out a serving bowl and fill it with arugula. Drizzle olive oil (or you can use sunnie oil instead!) over the greens and squeeze in about half a lemon worth of lemon juice. Kosher salt and black pepper and you’ve got a lovely light little meal. Thin shaved pieces of parmesan with the arugula salad is great, or try Rosa Maria goat cheese. Dive on in! A big ol’ pile of this salad on top of your freshly grilled pizza will do your meal right. That’s some good eating right there.

These last couple of weeks having fresh green beans to eat, takes me right back to summer evenings on my grandparents’ porch, snapping beans for supper that night. My grandpa grew those beans and they were always perfect. Now I’m so glad I can get perfect summer green beans grown by Abie Vegetable People! They grew the beans for us this week and last, and they’ve really mastered it. I’m good with snacking on these beans raw, but if you want to cook them, check out this post from the folks at The Kitchn for some green bean prep tips and simple cooking method. I really hope you have a porch or nice spot to sit, take a load off, and snap some beans for your supper tonight.

Have you all noticed the various items we have for your beloved pets? We’ve got grassfed RAW milk for pets and Dog-Beer biscuits! Give them a try. Or, just let your dogs and cats give them a try…Let us know what they think!

Turnips are in your boxes this week. One of the many ways to enjoy this delightful root, is to pickle ’em. See the recipe below from David Lebovitz for a dead-easy pickle that also uses beet root and garlic!  Read the whole article HERE

                                        Pickled Turnips

 

pickled turnips                                                                pickled turnips pickled turnips
Turnip pickles
 are usually tinted with beets making them a lovely rosy-pink color. As they sit, they go through a remarkable transformation in terms of color. At first the brine is ever-so slightly tingled by the color of the beets. Then, a day or so later, the liquid deepens in color and the turnips take on a neon-pink hue, so much so that you can’t distinguish the beets from the turnips when the pickles are finally ready. They’re easy to make – just make a simple brine, some sliced up turnips, a few batons of beets, and a week to do their thing.

turnips for pickling

I find these pickles don’t last as long as others, and they’re best enjoyed up within a few weeks after they’re made. Thankfully they’re easy – and inexpensive – to make, so you can whip up a batch in no time. In fact, after my dinner guests wiped me out, I went out and bought more turnips. And now I have another jar in my refrigerator, ready and waiting for the next onslaught of guests.

You can dial down the amount of garlic, but I like the slightly aggressive flavor of the slices in the brine. Use whatever white salt is available where you are, but avoid fine table salt as it’s quite unpleasant and bitter. Gray salt will discolor the brine.For those who like to tinker, although these are usually served as they are, a few sprigs of fresh dill, or dill flowers, in the brine will take them in a different direction. A hot pepper will add some zip.

3 cups water
1/3 cup  coarse white salt such as kosher salt or sea salt
1 bay leaf
1 cup white vinegar distilled
2- pounds turnips, peeled
1 small beet, or a few slices from a regular-size beet, peeled
3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
1. In a saucepan, heat about one-third of the water. Add the salt and bay leaf, stirring until the salt is dissolved.
2. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Once cool, add the vinegar and the rest of the water.
3. Cut the turnips and the beet into batons, about the size of French fries. Put the turnips, beets, and garlic slices into a large, clean jar, then pour the salted brine over them in the jar, including the bay leaf.
4. Cover and let sit at room temperature, in a relatively cool place, for one week. Once done, they can be refrigerated until ready to serve.

Storage: The pickles will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator. They’ll be rather strong at first, but will mellow after a few days. They should be enjoyed within a six weeks after they’re made, as they tend to get less-interesting if they sit too long.

 

                  Ahh it’s summer. Time to Turnip the Beets and enjoy!